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Breeding

  • A caesarean section, or C-section, is major surgery performed to remove puppies from the uterus. This is most commonly performed as an emergency procedure when there is difficulty with natural birth.

  • A caesarean section or C-section is major surgery performed to remove kittens from the uterus. This is most commonly performed as an emergency procedure when there is difficulty with natural birth. Most cats recover quickly from this procedure. Most cats have fully recovered from anesthesia by the time they are discharged to go home.

  • For the next two months, even if everything went smoothly with the birth, you have a lot of work to do!

  • The streamlined, steel-gray Weimaraner (Weim) was bred to sustain long hours of hunting birds and even large animals. A great companion for runners or agility enthusiasts, the Weim is ready for any physical activity.

  • Nobody has ever accused the Otterhound of primping and preening. She is a come-as-you-are kind of dog, with casual good looks and a laid-back personality.

  • The Chinese Shar-Pei tends to present one face to his family and another to the world at large. To the latter, the dog behaves in a calm, dignified and aloof manner; with his family, the dog will lighten up and tap into his inner clown.

  • Nobody would call him "slender," but when he trots down the street with that funny rolling gait, his short legs and wide body doing their best to keep up the pace, he makes everybody smile. The stockiest spaniel, the Clumber is also the most easygoing - in fact, one of the most low-keyed of all sporting dogs.

  • Breeding, pregnancy, and birthing in cats may seem simple, but can have complications. Cats can have multiple litters in a year. It is important to know when your cat may be expecting to give birth so that you can be available to provide assistance if necessary. It is important to know what signs indicate that your cat may be experiencing difficulties delivering the kittens and know when veterinary attention is needed.

  • Most cats care for their kittens with little need for human intervention; however, if they do not, then their caregivers will need to step in. Maintaining a warm environment and ensuring they are receiving enough milk is critical to survival. Weights should be checked daily in the first 2 weeks and any prolonged crying should be investigated thoroughly. Feeding can be supplemented with commercial milk replacer if needed and all kittens can start the weaning process around 4 weeks of age by offering gruel-like kitten food mixed with milk replacer. Rarely milk fever or eclampsia can affect the mother causing spasms and panting around the weaning time and must be addressed by a veterinarian immediately. Kitten diets that have been trialed for growth are recommended. Kittens normally receive temporary immunity through the placenta while in utero and by ingesting their mother’s milk in their first day of life. This immunity starts to fade around 6 weeks of age and vaccination is recommended at that time. Worms are a common affliction in kittens and regular deworming is recommended starting at 2 weeks old. Contact your veterinarian for specific instructions. Commercial over the counter dewormers can be harmful to young kittens.

  • During the last week of pregnancy, the female often starts to look for a safe place for whelping. Some pets appear to become confused, wanting to be with their owners and at the same time wanting to prepare their nest. It is a good idea to get your pet used to the place where you want her to have her puppies well in advance of whelping. Some dogs like the owner to be with them the whole time they are in labor. Others prefer to have their puppies in seclusion.