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Reptiles

  • Telehealth is a broad term that refers to the use of telecommunications to provide health-related services. Telehealth services can be delivered by a variety of methods including telephone, text messaging, internet chat, and videoconferencing. Teletriage is the act of performing triage remotely, via telephone or internet and helps determine the urgency of your pet’s medical concern. Telemedicine refers to the practice of medicine at a distance. In the context of veterinary medicine, telemedicine refers to a veterinarian formulating a diagnosis and treatment plan for your pet without an in-person examination. Telemedicine is typically only permitted within the context of an existing Veterinarian-Client-Patient Relationship. Given the current COVID-19 pandemic and social/physical distancing requirements however, some federal and local governments have relaxed the requirements surrounding telemedicine.

  • When leaving home for vacations, pet owners are confronted with the problem of what to do with their pets. Should they take them along or leave them at home? Reviewing a summary of boarding options and travel guidelines will make the decision easier while safe guarding the well-being of your pet and providing your own peace of mind.

  • Nitenpyram is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat adult flea infestations and fly larvae infestations. Give as directed by your veterinarian. The most common side effect is itchiness. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, in pets that weigh less than 2 pounds, or in pets younger than 4 weeks old. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Diazepam is given by mouth, injection, or into the rectum and is used off label to treat anxiety, seizures, tense muscles, or decreased appetite. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects include sleepiness, increased appetite, incoordination, weakness, agitation, drooling, and aggression. Do not give to cats by mouth, and do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other benzodiazepines, or in pets with severe liver disease. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Prednisone/prednisolone is given by mouth or injection and is used on and off label to treat Addison’s disease, inflammatory conditions, neoplasia (cancer), and immune-mediated diseases. Give this medication as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include increased drinking, increased urination, and increased appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, or pets with systemic fungal infections, viral infections, ulcers, tuberculosis, or Cushing’s disease. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Erythromycin is given by mouth or injection and is used off label to treat bacterial infections and gastrointestinal motility problems in many animal species. Common side effects include diarrhea, lack of appetite, and vomiting. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, have liver disease or dysfunction, or in pets such as rabbits, gerbils, guinea pigs, or hamsters. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Ponazuril is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat protozoal parasites in a variety of animal species. Side effects are uncommon but may include soft stools. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it. Ponazuril should be used cautiously in pregnant or lactating pets, and dogs with/susceptible to dry eye (keratoconjunctivitis sicca/KCS). If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Marbofloxacin is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat certain bacterial infections including leishmaniasis, tuberculosis, and hemoplasmosis. Common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other quinolones, or in small and medium breed dogs before 8 months of age, in large breed dogs before 12 months of age, in giant breed dogs before 18 months of age, or in cats before 12 months of age. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Carprofen is used on and off label and is given by mouth in the form of a tablet to treat pain and inflammation. The most common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, and decreased appetite. Do not use this medication in pets with bleeding disorders, in pets that are allergic to it or other NSAIDs in the same class, or in pets concurrently using corticosteroids or other NSAIDs. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Nystatin is an antifungal, given by mouth in the form of a tablet or liquid suspension, and used off label to treat Candida fungal infections in dogs, cats, birds, and reptiles. Side effects are rare, but at high doses could cause stomach upset or mouth irritation. It should not be used in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.