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Small Mammals

  • If you saw a person have a seizure or fall down the stairs or wreck a car, what would you do? You'd call 911. But what should you do when the crisis involves your pet? You call a pet emergency number. Ask your veterinary hospital how they handle after-hour emergencies.

  • Ferrets have several unique problems; understanding these problems will allow you to better care for your pet and minimize future health care problems.

  • Telehealth is a broad term that refers to the use of telecommunications to provide health-related services. Telehealth services can be delivered by a variety of methods including telephone, text messaging, internet chat, and videoconferencing. Teletriage is the act of performing triage remotely, via telephone or internet and helps determine the urgency of your pet’s medical concern. Telemedicine refers to the practice of medicine at a distance. In the context of veterinary medicine, telemedicine refers to a veterinarian formulating a diagnosis and treatment plan for your pet without an in-person examination. Telemedicine is typically only permitted within the context of an existing Veterinarian-Client-Patient Relationship. Given the current COVID-19 pandemic and social/physical distancing requirements however, some federal and local governments have relaxed the requirements surrounding telemedicine.

  • Cyclophosphamide is given by mouth or injection and is used off label to treat various cancers such as lymphoma, leukemia, carcinoma, and sarcoma. Common side effects include hair loss and hair coat changes. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or that cannot be sufficiently monitored during treatment, are pregnant or lactating, have urinary obstruction, infection, bone marrow dysfunction, or have had an episode of blood in the urine that is not associated with a bladder infection. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • When leaving home for vacations, pet owners are confronted with the problem of what to do with their pets. Should they take them along or leave them at home? Reviewing a summary of boarding options and travel guidelines will make the decision easier while safe guarding the well-being of your pet and providing your own peace of mind.

  • Melatonin is given by mouth or as an implant under the skin and is used to treat sleep and behavior disorders, adrenal disease, and non-allergic hair loss, to suppress the heat cycle, and to improve breeding rates. Give as directed. Side effects are not common but may include sleepiness. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Orbifloxacin is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat certain susceptible bacterial infections. Give as directed by your veterinarian. The most common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, and lack of appetite. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or other quinolones, in growing pets, or in conjunction with cyclosporine. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Lincomycin is given by mouth or injection and is used on and off label to treat certain bacterial infections. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, or drooling. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it or similar drugs, in pets with a candida fungal infection, very young pets, or in rabbits, hamsters, guinea pigs, or horses. If a negative reaction occurs, please call the veterinary office.

  • Kaolin/pectin is given by mouth and is used off label to treat diarrhea and certain toxicities. Use as directed by your veterinarian. Side effects are uncommon, but constipation is possible (rarely). Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, or to control severe diarrhea or diarrhea that is caused by an infection. Do not use the combination product that includes bismuth subsalicylate in cats. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Griseofulvin is given by mouth and is used on and off label to treat skin, hair, and nail fungal infections. Give as directed by your veterinarian. Common side effects include lack of appetite, vomiting, and diarrhea. Do not use in pets that are allergic to it, pregnant pets, breeding males, pets that have severe liver disease, or in cats with FIV or FeLV. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.