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  • Although lowly in position, your dog's feet occupy a top spot in importance. How can a dog navigate the world without the support of four healthy feet? And the pads on the bottom of those feet are where the rubber meets the road!

  • The tail is an important part of the canine anatomy and is actually an extension of the spine. This complex tail structure of bone, muscles, nerves, and blood vessels can easily be injured.

  • Ferrets have several unique problems; understanding these problems will allow you to better care for your pet and minimize future health care problems.

  • Contrary to popular belief, feeling your pet's ears or nose won't tell you if his temperature is abnormal. The only surefire way to determine if your pet has an abnormally high or low body temperature is to actually take his temperature with a thermometer.

  • Cats are nosy creatures, sniffing at anything of interest. Since felines find insects interesting, they sniff at them, and if they stick their nose where it doesn't belong, they may get a quick reprimand that could be fatal.

  • Many owners say that they will never leave their dog in boarding kennels. However, situations may occur in which you are unable to take your dog with you, and boarding kennels may be your best alternative.

  • Heat stroke is a term commonly used for hyperthermia or elevated body temperature. Generally speaking, if a pet's body temperature exceeds 103°F (39.4°C), it is considered abnormal or hyperthermic.

  • An umbilical hernia is a protrusion (outward bulging) of the abdominal lining, abdominal fat or a portion of abdominal organ(s) through the area around the umbilicus (navel or belly button). The umbilicus in dogs and cats is located on their underside just below the ribcage.

  • The streamlined, steel-gray Weimaraner (Weim) was bred to sustain long hours of hunting birds and even large animals. A great companion for runners or agility enthusiasts, the Weim is ready for any physical activity.

  • Nobody has ever accused the Otterhound of primping and preening. She is a come-as-you-are kind of dog, with casual good looks and a laid-back personality.